Deep Ocean Observing Strategies for a Predicted Ocean

An UN Ocean Decade Laboratory Satellite Activity

Dive Deep! Current and future leaders explore future directions in deep ocean observing – societal needs and scientific gaps, coordination between deep sea biologists and modelers, and the future of tech in the deep.

When: Sept. 16, 5pm-8pm CEST

Where: Zoom

Click here to register (or scroll to the bottom of the page)

Download the Agenda

For more information, email info@deepoceanobserving.org

Explore current gaps/challenges and future opportunities in deep ocean observing in four interactive panels that will foster discussions across disciplines within and outside the research community. Panels include both current and future leaders.

  1. What are the societal needs and scientific gaps in the deep ocean?
  2. What are the challenges and opportunities in biological/ecological modeling in the deep ocean and how can better coordination with ocean observers address these gaps? Planned in coordination with Challenger-150.
  3. What are the gaps in technological development in the deep ocean?
  4. Where do we wish to see deep ocean observing in 10 years? A synthesis discussion panel conducted entirely by ECRs, planned in coordination with the UN Decade ECOP Program.

This activity seeks to bring together deep ocean networks and Decade programs that span ocean observing, exploration, modeling, and management communities, particularly early career researchers.

Panel 1: Societal Needs and Scientific Gaps in the Deep Ocean

Moderators

Lisa Levin

Professor, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA

Lisa A. Levin is a Distinguished Professor of Biological Oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. She is passionate about the deep sea and researches the ecology of different ecosystems on deep continental margins, their vulnerability to climate change and to human resource extraction. She serves as scientific co-lead for both the Deep-Ocean Stewardship Initiative and the Deep-Ocean Observing Strategy. Over the past 40 years Lisa has led or participated in over 45 expeditions to the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Oceans.

Leslie Smith

Project Director, Deep Ocean Observing Strategy, USA

Leslie Smith is the Project Director for the Deep Ocean Observing Strategy. A biological oceanographer by training, she has built her career over the last decade in Science Communications and Community Engagement for US-based and international ocean observing programs including the Ocean Observatories Initiative and the Tropical Pacific Observing System. Additionally, her work focuses on Science Education initiatives, including data literacy projects with Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Panelists

Samantha Joye

Regents’ Professor, University of Georgia, USA

Samantha Joye is a Regents’ Professor at the University of Georgia. She is an expert in microbial ecology and biogeochemistry and her work employs analytical chemistry, microbiology, and geology to study deep sea extreme environments. Joye has participated in ~45 oceanographic expeditions, many utilizing HOVs and ROVs. She has published 230 peer-reviewed papers and is a Fellow of the AAAS, ASLO, AGU, AAM, and The Explorers Club. Joye is committed to science communication and public outreach and works to advance ocean and environmental literacy.

Craig Smith

Professor Emeritus, University of Hawai‘i, USA

Dr. Smith has led 66 major oceanographic research expeditions, and participated in over 100 HOV and ROV dives, in areas ranging from Antarctica to the equatorial Pacific. His research has included studied of biodiversity, climate change impacts, and potential effects of mining in deep-sea ecosystems. With a Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation, Smith spearheaded the creation of the network of marine protected areas (called APEIs) to safeguard regional biodiversity in the abyssal Clarion-Clipperton Zone from mining impacts. Smith has served as an advisor to the International Seabed Authority and numerous other international scientific bodies, and has published 219 papers and book chapters in the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

Baylor Fox-Kemper

Professor, Brown University, USA

In January, 2013, I joined what is now the Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences at Brown University. I work mostly within the Climate and Environment Group. My group studies the physics of the ocean and how the ocean fits into the Earth’s climate system, using models that range from the global scale to focused process models that apply universally. We seek mathematically interesting problems with practical uses. I was a coordinating lead author of the Ocean, Cryosphere, and Sea Level Change chapter of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report.

Luciana Génio

Environmental Analyst, The International Seabed Authority (ISA), Jamaica

Luciana Génio is the environmental analyst at the Secretariat of the International Seabed Authority (ISA) since 2019. Luciana stands at the science-policy interface, supporting the work of ISA on marine environmental protection in the Area, including management of environmental data on ISA’s DeepData database. Her responsibilities also include establishing and strengthening partnerships with the scientific community and relevant international organizations in support of ISA’s activities on marine scientific research in the Area. She has over 10 years of experience in deep-sea benthic ecology and evolution, having joined nearly 20 deep ocean expeditions in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Luciana holds a PhD in Earth and Environmental Sciences from the University of Leeds (UK).

María Emilia Bravo

Postdoctoral Researcher, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina

Dr. Bravo has a PhD in Biology from the Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS). Her interest is focused on the application of geophysical tools to the structure, functions, and management of methane seeps communities in both shallow and deep-sea ecosystems. As an early career researcher from a developing country, she is co-leader of the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative’s Offshore Energy working group (formerly Oil and Gas) https://www.dosi-project.org/topics/offshore-energy/

Rishi Sharma

Senior Fisheries Officer, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy

Rishi Sharma , PhD, is the Lead Technical Officer for the ABNJ Projects and the EAF Nansen Projects in FAO as well as the lead developer on evaluating the global stock status metric for FAO on sustainable fisheries. Prior to FAO he was at the Conservation Biology team at the NWFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA, Seattle, WA) and the Highly Migratory Stocks (HMS) team at SEFSC (Southeast Fishery Science Center) in Miami. Rishi also served as the chief Assessment Scientist for the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, the Scientific Coordinator in the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem Project for FAO in Thailand and was a biometrician for the Columbia River Inter Tribal Fisheries Commission (CRITFC). Dr Sharma has over 20 years of experience in population ecology, ecological statistics and stock assessment, with some 40 peer-reviewed journals on the subject, as well as over 100 grey literature reports on these topics.

Panel 2: Opportunities for Coordination in Biological/Ecological
Modeling in the Deep Sea

Moderators

Henry Ruhl

CeNCOOS Director, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, USA

Henry Ruhl is the Director of the Central & Northern California Ocean Observing System (CeNOOS). This has included work on the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) and Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) goals. He previously he served as Associate Head of the Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystems group of the National Oceanography Centre of the United Kingdom. His research interests include investigating connections between climate, variations in conditions over daily to decadal scales, and changes in seafloor biogeochemical and ecological conditions.

Patrick Heimbach

Professor, University of Texas at Austin, USA

Patrick Heimbach is a computational oceanographer and W. A. “Tex” Moncrief, Jr., chair III in Simulation-Based Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. His research focuses on ocean and ice dynamics and their role in the global climate system. He is an expert on the use of inverse methods applied to ocean and sea ice model parameter and state estimation, uncertainty quantification and observing system design. Patrick serves on the National Academy of Sciences’ Ocean Studies Board and NSF’s Advisory Committee for the Office of Polar Programs.

Panelists

Adrian Martin

Research Scientist, National Oceanography Centre, UK

Adrian Martin is based in the Marine Systems Modelling group at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) UK. With a maths background he has applied modelling to many aspects of marine ecology, from individual cells to global biogeochemical models. He is the current developer of the BORIS (Benthic Organisms Resolved In Size) benthic ecosystem model developed at NOC which uses allometry to simulate population dynamics.

Amelia Bridges

PhD Student, Plymouth University, UK

Amelia is a deep-sea ecologist based at the University of Plymouth in the UK, with research interests broadly falling into two fields: spatial ecology, and the use of science to inform policy and marine spatial planning. Having worked on habitat suitability models throughout her PhD, Amelia is interested in understanding how we can apply these models to areas that have previously undergone little scientific exploration. She hopes that modelling techniques can help to alleviate some of the issues that arise from biases in data collection towards the northern hemisphere.

Chih‐Lin Wei

Associate Professor, National Taiwan University, Taiwan

Chih‐Lin Wei is associate professor at the Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University. He is also currently the principal investigator of Ocean Data Bank (ODB) of Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), responsible for archiving, displaying, and providing oceanographic data collected by Taiwanese Research Vessels since 1986. He is interested in how environments shape and control the distribution, diversity and ecosystem functioning of seabed communities and how human activities, climate changes or natural disturbance may affect these biological attributes.

Charles Stock

Oceanographer, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA

Charles Stock is an Oceanographer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (NOAA/GFDL). He is one of the primary developers of the ocean biogeochemical component of GFDL’s global earth system model, ESM4.1, whose projections informed the latest assessment reported from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He also studies ocean predictability on seasonal to multi-annual timescales, and collaborates extensively with marine resource scientists to assess the impacts of climate variability and change on ecosystems, fisheries and protected species.

Telmo Morato

Research Associate, Univ. of the Azores, Portugal

I am a Marine Fisheries Biologist that has been involved in several research projects focusing seamount and deep-sea ecology, fisheries management and fish ecology. Currently, I’m leading the research project 2020 funded by the Azores government, aiming at developing ecosystem based management tools for the Azores and I have been acting has external advisor for the project Pelagic Conservation in the Open Ocean funded by the Lenfest Ocean Foundation, USA. In late 2013, I have joined the new large FP7 Project MIDAS Managing Impacts of Deep-sea Resource Exploitation on the Deep-sea where I study the impacts of mining exploration in the Azores. My scientific output,comprises about 50 contributions to peer-reviewed journals, 10 book chapters, and many reports.


This panel was planned in partnership with Challenger-150 and continues the conversation from their earlier Satellite Activity.

Panel 3: Gaps in Technological Development in the Deep Ocean

Moderators

Adam Soule

Executive Director, Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute, URI-GSO, USA

Adam Soule is a Professor at University of Rhode Island – Graduate School of Oceanography and the Executive Director of the NOAA-funded Ocean Exploration Cooperative Institute. Previously he served as the Chief Scientist for Deep Submergence at WHOI. His research focuses on volcanism in the ocean and associated tectonic and hydrothermal processes. He uses deep submergence vehicles (HOV, ROV, AUV) to observe and sample mid-ocean ridges, submarine arcs, ocean islands, and other benthic sites of heat, fluid, and chemical exchange.

Felix Janssen

Senior Scientist, Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany

Felix Janssen is a senior scientist at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany. He is a biological oceanographer by training and most interested in deep-ocean biogeochemistry with a focus on benthic respiration. He has a strong interest in advancing technologies for autonomous in situ measurements at the seafloor. Since a couple of years much of his work is focusing on assessing environmental impacts of deep-sea mining. Felix is a co-chair of the Deep-Ocean Observing Strategy and leading its biogeochemistry task team.

Panelists

Brennan Phillips

Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island, USA

Brennan Phillips specializes in the development and application of novel instrumentation for oceanographic research. His current research topics include low-light imaging of deep-sea biology and bioluminescence, soft robotic manipulators, hydraulic systems, distributed sensing, and low-cost, lightweight methods for ocean exploration. Dr. Phillips received his BS in Ocean Engineering from URI, an MS in Oceanography from the University of Connecticut, and a PhD in Oceanography from URI/GSO.

Bruce Howe

Research Professor, University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Bruce Howe develops ocean observing sensor network infrastructure. Projects have included basin-scale acoustic thermometry and the US Regional Cabled Array and the ALOHA Cabled Observatory. He currently serves as Chair of the ITU/WMO/UNESCO-IOC Joint Task Force SMART Subsea Cable initiative to integrating sensors into ocean-spanning submarine telecommunications cables.

Alana Sherman

Electrical Engineer, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, USA

Alana Sherman has been working as an Electrical Engineer at MBARI since 2003. Over that time, she has worked on a variety of scientific instruments and underwater vehicles. Included in that group are: the Benthic Rover, a rover able to be deployed autonomously for up to a year, the MiniROV, a multi-purpose fly-away ROV, and the AUV Gulper, a water sampler for AUVs. In addition to engineering development, Alana supervises a group of nine electrical engineers.

Jérôme Blandin

Subsea Observation Project Manager, IFREMER, France

Jérôme Blandin is an electrical engineer. He has been leading long-term subsea observation projects for 20 years. He promotes the use of light, relocatable networked platforms for which he developed a set of reliable key components in conjunction with industrial companies. At European level, he contributed to harmonizing observational practices and to sharing common technical solutions for cost efficiency and reliability. He is currently leading EMSO ERIC Engineering and Logistics Service Group.

Laura Cimoli

Postdoctoral Researcher, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA

Laura Cimoli is a physical oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. Her research focuses on the dynamics and variability of the large-scale deep ocean circulation, to better understand how they contribute to the regulation and variability of the climate system. She relies on observations to investigate how ocean circulation contributes to the sequestration and transport of natural and anthropogenic tracers. Laura holds a PhD in Physical Oceanography from the University of Oxford (UK).

Panel 4: Where do We Wish to See Deep Ocean Observing in 10 years?

An entirely ECOP panel focused on charting the path for the future of deep ocean observing.

Moderators

Leslie Smith

Project Director, Deep Ocean Observing Strategy, USA

Leslie Smith is the Project Director for the Deep Ocean Observing Strategy. A biological oceanographer by training, she has built her career over the last decade in Science Communications and Community Engagement for US-based and international ocean observing programs including the Ocean Observatories Initiative and the Tropical Pacific Observing System. Additionally, her work focuses on Science Education initiatives, including data literacy projects with Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Justin Stopa

Assistant Professor, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, USA

Justin Stopa is an Assistant Professor at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa in the Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering. His driving interests are focused on observing the ocean especially in a critical time of rapid global change. His current area of interest is dedicated to the development of algorithms for radars, extreme sea states, and the wind and wave climate through the combination of numerical models, in situ observations, and remote sensing methods. He is active in building collaborations within the ocean-observing community in an interdisciplinary way.

Panelists

Pradeep A. Singh

Research Associate/Doctoral candidate, University of Bremen, Malaysia

Pradeep A. Singh is a researcher and doctoral candidate at the University of Bremen in Bremen, Germany. He has spent the last seven years researching and consulting on various topics related to international environmental law and the law of the sea. Pradeep holds an LL.M degree from Harvard Law School, an LL.M. degree in Global Environment and Climate Change Law from the University of Edinburgh, and an LL.B. from the University of Malaya in his home country, Malaysia. His current research centers around the legal and regulatory aspects of deep seabed mining and the conservation of marine resources in areas beyond national jurisdiction. Pradeep is an active member of the Early Career Ocean Professionals (ECOPs) group.

Laura G. Elsler

Research Consultant, World Maritime University/UN Agency, Sweden

Laura G Elsler is a social-ecological system scientist focusing on complex dynamics of ocean governance at local and global scales. Currently she analyzes accelerating exploitation and governance trajectories for deep and midwater ocean using quantitative analysis and participatory social-ecological modelling. Laura holds a PhD from the Stockholm Resilience Centre (Maja Schlüter), is affiliated with the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at Princeton University (Simon A Levin), and currently serves as a Research Consultant at World Maritime University/UN agency (Mary S Wisz). She has contributed to the IPBES report on the use of wild species and co-leads efforts for inclusion and diversity in the UN Ocean Decade through the Early Career Ocean Professionals Program.

Amelia Bridges

PhD Student, Plymouth University, UK

Amelia is a deep-sea ecologist based at the University of Plymouth in the UK, with research interests broadly falling into two fields: spatial ecology, and the use of science to inform policy and marine spatial planning. Having worked on habitat suitability models throughout her PhD, Amelia is interested in understanding how we can apply these models to areas that have previously undergone little scientific exploration. She hopes that modelling techniques can help to alleviate some of the issues that arise from biases in data collection towards the northern hemisphere.

Brennan Phillips

Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island, USA

Brennan Phillips specializes in the development and application of novel instrumentation for oceanographic research. His current research topics include low-light imaging of deep-sea biology and bioluminescence, soft robotic manipulators, hydraulic systems, distributed sensing, and low-cost, lightweight methods for ocean exploration. Dr. Phillips received his BS in Ocean Engineering from URI, an MS in Oceanography from the University of Connecticut, and a PhD in Oceanography from URI/GSO.

Chih‐Lin Wei

Associate Professor, National Taiwan University, Taiwan

Chih‐Lin Wei is associate professor at the Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University. He is also currently the principal investigator of Ocean Data Bank (ODB) of Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), responsible for archiving, displaying, and providing oceanographic data collected by Taiwanese Research Vessels since 1986. He is interested in how environments shape and control the distribution, diversity and ecosystem functioning of seabed communities and how human activities, climate changes or natural disturbance may affect these biological attributes.

María Emilia Bravo

Postdoctoral Researcher, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina

Dr. Bravo has a PhD in Biology from the Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS). Her interest is focused on the application of geophysical tools to the structure, functions, and management of methane seeps communities in both shallow and deep-sea ecosystems. As an early career researcher from a developing country, she is co-leader of the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative’s Offshore Energy working group (formerly Oil and Gas) https://www.dosi-project.org/topics/offshore-energy/

Laura Cimoli

Postdoctoral Researcher, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA

Laura Cimoli is a physical oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. Her research focuses on the dynamics and variability of the large-scale deep ocean circulation, to better understand how they contribute to the regulation and variability of the climate system. She relies on observations to investigate how ocean circulation contributes to the sequestration and transport of natural and anthropogenic tracers. Laura holds a PhD in Physical Oceanography from the University of Oxford (UK).


This panel was planned in partnership with the UN Decade Early Career Ocean Professionals Program.

Expected Outcomes

  1. Convening multiple perspectives on deep observing needs to identify synergies
  2. Identify what we hope to predict for a future ocean and what observations and new technologies are needed (and where) to make these predictions.
  3. Determine Decade directions for DOOS working groups to focus on over the next four years
  4. Find individuals (and/or programmes) who would like to participate in the DOOS Decade effort via iDOOS Working Groups
  5. Find early career individuals who would like to participate in the DOERs program

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The event is organized by Deep Ocean Observing Strategy in partnership with Challenger-150 and the UN Decade ECOP Program.

Image courtesy Schmidt Ocean Institute. FK210726 Biodiverse Borderlands expedition. Lisa Levin Chief Scientist